Sandstone Buildings

Our sandstone buildings date back to the 1800's with sturdy construction, the use of stone, and the shaping of dormers. Unique styles include: Victorian with elements of the Georgian and Four Square styles built in sandstone with a copper sheathed roof and incorporating a chimney with a central window, Scottish crofter style and Picturesque style whose interesting features include a Palladian style window and bargeboard trim.
Old Post Office
20 Water St, Pictou

The Old Post Office was built in 1895 to accommodate the increased volume of mail passing through Pictou bound for Prince Edward Island and Quebec. This is a Victorian building with elements of the Georgian and Four Square styles built in sandstone with a copper sheathed roof. The west dormer is unique, incorporating a chimney with a central window.


Pictou Advocate Building
21 George St, Pictou

From the age of 18, John D. MacDonald had a dream of setting up his own printing press. In the fall of 1891, he opened a job printing shop in the town of Pictou, Nova Scotia. The business began to grow under MacDonald’s ambitious direction and in December 1893 he purchased a secondhand newspaper press to launch The Pictou Advocate. In January 1900, a fire destroyed the press and offices. However, with relentless determination and the help of his community, MacDonald rebuilt his print company and newspaper; never missing an issue. The operation took residence in many buildings in Pictou, before finally settling in the stone house on George Street where The Pictou Advocate resides today.


R.P. Grant - Pictou Men's Club
58 Front Street, Pictou

R.P. Grant home was built circa 1853 for merchant/politician R.P. Grant. Grant, whose father was a publisher and bookseller, arrived from Scotland in 1835. He married Annie Carmichael, daughter of the founder of New Glasgow. A pro-Confederation Liberal, he was a member of the Legislative Assembly from 1859 to 1863. He was appointed a Senator in 1877. The house is an excellent example of the Picturesque style whose interesting features include a Palladian style window and bargeboard trim.


Sandstone Home
102 Coleraine Street, Pictou

This charming sandstone structure was designed in Scottish crofter style, and dates back to about 1820. It is constructed with double walls, allowing for an air space of sixteen inches between the walls for insulation. This building became well known when it was used as the “Shire Shop” antique and gift store. It is now a private home.


Scanlan Graham-Scanlan Law Office
98 Water Street, Pictou

This double house dates back to 1824, and is typical of Scottish architectural style in its sturdy construction, the use of stone, and the shaping of dormers.


Scotiabank Building
70 Coleraine St, Pictou

The Bank of Nova Scotia was built circa 1878 by Adam McKean for the Pictou Bank. In the mid-1880’s the Pictou Bank fell upon hard times and sold the property to the Bank of N.S. for $5,000.00. This is the third oldest branch of the Bank of N.S. in the province. The Second Empire structure features beautify ogee dormers and keystone labels above the first storey windows and doors.


Stone House Building
13 Water Street, Pictou

The Stone House was built circa 1832 for Alex Campbell and Andrew Miller who carried on a baking business in the building until 1864. In the 1960’s and early 1970’s, the building housed the Public Health offices. An excellent example of a Scottish stone house featuring the five sided dormers and endwall chimneys.


The Consulate Inn Building
157 Water St, Pictou

Built circa 1810 for George Smith, timber merchant and Member of the Legislative Assembly on three occasions commencing in 1819. The house is a cross between Georgian and Scottish vernacular styles. In the mid-1800’s the building housed the American Consulate. Another previous occupant was J. Welsford MacDonald, a Liberal MLA elected to four terms in the legislature beginning in 1920. The building is now a private home.


Water Street Studio Building
110 Water Street, Pictou

Water St. Studios built circa 1825, this building is a fine example of Scottish stone houses. Distinctive features are the Scottish (5 sided) dormers and the rough cut and polished stone block construction. Since its early days, the building has been a combined storefront and residence. From the 1920’s to the 1960’s is housed the offices of the last of a long line of Harris Sheriffs whose family arrived aboard the Betsy in 1767.


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